Thursday, 31 March 2011

More Peter and Jane - 6a!

I introduced Emily to Peter and Jane Book 6a for the first time this evening and was pleasantly surprised when she read the first four pages of the book without much assistance.  I'm so glad that she seems to be more receptive to the Peter and Jane series.  Now that we are past the mind-numbingly boring Levels 1 and 2, Emily genuinely looks forward to reading about Peter, Jane, their friend Pam and their dogs.  Phew!

Book 6a
Of late, our approach has been not to rush Emily into reading more and more words. We have not been "coaching" her by drilling her with flashcards or forcing her to learn to read words off a list. 

Instead, we have been encouraging her to recognise that reading is a useful skill in day-to-day life.  We encourage her to read everything - certain words in newspaper headlines, shop names, road signs, brochure headings... and we praise her when she gets something right.   For example, this evening, as we drove into Clementi Arcade, Emily read the sign, "Cold Storage - The Fresh Food People". 

I have to say, it is pure joy to witness Emily's glee when she realises that the symbols and letters which she has been seeing around her are actually words and strings of words that make sense in context.  And that's priceless!

2 comments:

  1. With your influence, i grabbed a couple P&J books from level 4-6 while at the bookstore and had S read a page each! I was curious to know if he was able to read too! LOL! The good thing was he could read, the bad thing was he could only tolerate one page per book- and that's only AFTER i bribe him with his fav bread! Emily's reading appetite is really mature i must say!

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  2. I'm glad to know that I'm not the only one who will stoop to bribery! :) S is doing really well. Yes, it's tough for children their age to read the whole book at one sitting, especially when you start to get to Levels 5 and 6 and beyond, so we usually do three or four pages at a go, at the very most. One way to encourage him to read on is to say, "wow, let's read the next page and find out what Peter and Jane saw on the farm!" or "oooh, if we read on, we can see what the family did on holiday!". Give it a go and see!

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